The Medical Office of A. A. Emami, D.O., M.D., F.H.U., F.A.C.O.I.
Board Certified Internal Medicine
Fellow, Hospitalist's Union
Fellow, American College of Osteopathic Internists
Former Certified Personal Trainer, American College of Sports Medicine (A.C.S.M.)

8080 East Gelding Drive
Suite D-101
Scottsdale, Arizona 85260

Phone*:                    480.508.0541

Facsimile:                    480.508.0542
E-Mail**:  info@menshealthaz.com

When to Call 911 or Seek Care at the Nearest Hospital's Emergency Department

Below is a general list of conditions/symptoms that should prompt a 911 call or seeking of care at the nearest hospital's emergency department. Please read all of the content because there is a great deal of overlap in terms of clinical signs and symptoms between different medical conditions. This is not an all-inclusive list. If one is uncertain about his or her condition, he or she should call 911 or seek care at the nearest hospital's emergency department in order to err on the side of caution.

General symptoms/conditions for which you should call 911 or seek care at the nearest hospital's emergency department:

General:

  • Abdominal pain or new onset of pain of any part of the body (generally without an identifiable cause).
  • Abnormal coloring of the skin or of any part of the body.
  • Abnormal odor/scent from any part of your body (excluding body odor).
  • Fever.
  • Pale appearance.
  • Poisoning.
  • Swelling of any part of the body (generally without an identifiable cause).
  • Unexplained (unintentional) weight loss.

Cardiological (possibly heart related):

  • Blacking out/fainting/passing out.
  • Cold sweats/clamminess.
  • The feeling of almost blacking out/fainting/passing out.
  • Chest pain/chest pressure/chest tightness.
  • Difficulty breathing or increased oxygen requirement for those who use oxygen at home.
  • Light-headedness or the sensation of feeling faint.
  • New onset of becoming easily short of breath with normal daily activities.
  • Pain/pressure/tightness that may or may not start in your chest which travels up your neck and/or to your jaw and/or to either arm.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Shortness of breath while lying flat.
  • Swelling of any part of the body (generally without an identifiable cause).
  • Tearing sensation between the shoulder blades.
  • The sensation that your heart is beating too fast.
  • The sensation that your heart is beating too slow.
  • The sensation that your heart is skipping a beat or beating in an irregular pattern/rhythm.
  • A tingling or "funny" sensation in the teeth, the toes, or other parts of the body. These may be symptoms of a heart attack especially in diabetic patients and female patients.
  • Very high blood pressure (if one's systolic blood pressure ("the top number") is greater than 160 even after taking their regular blood pressure medication(s)).

Endocrinological (possibly hormone related):

  • Blood sugar (glucose) of 79 or less even after taking corrective measures (consuming a high sugar beverage or food).
    • Some common signs/symptoms may include confusion, development of numbness and/or tingling, development of seizures, feeling anxious/nervous, feeling clammy, feeling dizzy, feeling faint, feeling irritable, feeling light headed, and/or feeling shaky.
  • Blood sugar (glucose) of 400 or greater even after taking regular diabetes medication(s).
    • Some common signs/symptoms may include becoming confused, developing abdominal pain, developing a "fruity" odor/scent to your breath, developing excessive hunger, developing excessive thirst, feeling nauseated, feeling short of breath and/or feeling weak.
  • Breath with a "fruity" odor/scent.
  • Excessive hunger (beyond what is normal for an individual).
  • Excessive thirst (beyond what is normal for an individual).
  • Unexplained (unintentional) weight loss.

Gastroenterological (possibly stomach/colon related):

  • Abdominal pain or new onset of pain of any part of the body (generally without an identifiable cause).
  • Black/tarry appearing stool (please note that taking medications which contain bismuth (such as Pepto-Bismol) iron supplements and some other medications may cause stool to have this appearance). Black/tarry appearing stools may be a sign of bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Please note some foods may cause stool to have a black or tarry appearance. Some (not all) foods that may cause this appearance are beets, black licorice, blueberries, cranberries, dark chocolate and red food dye (which can be found in gelatin or fruit punch).
  • Blood in the stool (if one contacts 911 or seeks care at the nearest emergency department, they should make those parties aware if they have a known history of diverticulosis and/or hemorrhoids).
  • Oily stool.
  • Unresolving diarrhea.
  • Unresolving nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Vomiting blood.
  • Yellowing of the skin (jaundice).

Immunological (possibly immune system related):

  • Allergic reactions. Some common signs/symptoms may include difficulty breathing, low-blood pressure, swelling, weakness and wheezing.

Nephrological (possibly kidney related):

  • Swelling of any part of the body (generally without an identifiable cause).

Neurological (possibly nervous system related):

  • Blacking out/fainting/passing out.
  • The feeling of almost blacking out/fainting/passing out.
  • Changes in hearing or loss of hearing.
  • Changes in vision or loss of vision.
  • Confusion.
  • Difficulty speaking.
  • Difficulty swallowing.
  • Dizziness.
  • Facial drooping.
  • Light-headedness or the sensation of feeling faint.
  • New inability to walk or new difficulty walking.
  • New onset (within hours) of numbness or tingling of any part of one's body.
  • New onset of paralysis (the inability to move) any part of one's body.
  • Seizure.
  • Slurred speech.
  • Weakness (generalized or on any part of one's body).

Ophthalmological (possibly eye related):

  • Changes in vision or loss of vision.
  • Eye injuries.
  • Implantation of a foreign body in the eyes.

Psychiatric (possibly head related):

  • Abnormal or bizarre thoughts.
  • Attempt to harm one's self.
  • Attempt to harm others.
  • Drug overdose (intentional or unintentional with any type of drug whether it is illegal, legal, over the counter or by prescription).
  • Harming oneself.
  • Harming others.
  • Hearing voices that may not be real.
  • Seeing things that may not be real.
  • Thoughts of harming one's self.
  • Thoughts of harming others.

Pulmonary (possibly lung related):

  • Coughing up blood.
  • Difficulty breathing or increased oxygen requirement for those who use oxygen at home.
  • New onset of becoming easily short of breath with normal daily activities.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Shortness of breath while lying flat.

Trauma (possibly injury related):

  • Broken bones.
  • Concussion.
  • Gunshot wounds.
  • Rape.
  • Stabbing.
  • Trauma.

Urological (possibly bladder related):

  • Blood in the urine (please note, some foods may cause urine to have a red or pink appearance. Some (not all) foods that may cause this appearance are beets, blackberries and rhubarb).
  • Decreased urination compared to what is a normal pattern for an individual.
  • Inability to urinate (unless one is undergoing dialysis).
  • Not urinating for an interval of more than 10 hours (unless one is undergoing dialysis).
  • Priapism (a painful and/or prolonged erection).
  • Very dark urine.

Above is a general list of conditions/symptoms that should prompt a 911 call or seeking of care at the nearest hospital's emergency department. Please read all of the content because there is a great deal of overlap in terms of clinical signs and symptoms between different medical conditions. This is not an all-inclusive list. If one is uncertain about his or her condition, he or she should call 911 or seek care at the nearest hospital's emergency department in order to err on the side of caution.


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If you believe you have a medical emergency, you should immediately call 911 or your nearest Physician or go the nearest hospital's emergency department.

This site is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment, or services to you or to any other individual. The information provided in this site is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call, consultation or the advice of a Physician or other health-care provider. Men's Health Care is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis, or any other information, services or product you obtain through this site.

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Medical information changes constantly. Therefore the information on this site should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive, nor should you rely on such information to recommend a course of treatment for you or any other individual. Reliance on any information provided on this site is solely at your own risk.

Please note, the medical care offered by Men's Health Care should not be construed as an emergency service. Men's Health Care's hours of availability do vary. Please call the office for further information and for the latest updates on availability of services.